terresdebrume:

lewstonewar:

stuckinabucket:

I keep seeing a lot of justifications for the “Peter Quill forgot he had a passenger” thing that boil down to “No, it’s a totally cool way to illustrate that the character’s an asshole!  You know, for character development!” and it’s just like…not really, people.
I mean, yes, that is a way that you can demonstrate a character is a total asshole.  (There are also other ways to demonstrate that same thing that doesn’t come off as an “lol fuck you” directed squarely at half your audience, but that’s a different argument.)  But the problem with that is that otherwise he doesn’t come off as the sort of asshole who’d do that sort of assholish thing.  He’s immature and dysfunctional and venal, yes.  But the first time we get any sort of character scene for him, he’s got a black eye from getting into a righteous-anger fight over a dead frog.  He’s surrounded by what appears to be a loving family in the throes of grief, from whom he’s summarily kidnapped by what turns out to be a gang of space-pirates.
He spends the rest of the film coming off like the sort of person who’s had to play The Functional One for the crew of the HMS Warp Factor Clusterfuck for over half his life.  I don’t know if the repeated comments about eating him were meant to be taken absolutely at face value—there’s an argument to be made for reading them as some seriously fucked-up emotional blackmail rather than a genuine threat—but the dialogue about Yondu killing him if he gets out of line clearly isn’t a joke.  Whatever affection or use the pirates have for him, it’s explicitly not enough to keep him safe from them.  It’s not exactly an accident that the first instinct we see him showing almost every time there’s trouble is to try to smooth things over.
Rocket starts planning the escape from prison, and what happens? Groot straight-up rips something out of the fucking wall right in front of the guards.  Drax engages in some good old ultraviolence.  Gamora comes back with a device that was hardwired into somebody’s nervous system without batting an eye.  Peter…pays a guy a (judging by other sums mentioned) sizable chunk of money in exchange for the thing he needs.  Attempting to beat the dude up and take his stuff never even seems to occur to him.
He tries to talk everybody down when the other inmates are planning to murder Gamora.  He tries to talk everybody down when Rocket and Drax start fighting.  He’s the one who calls the Nova Corps to warn them instead of just showing up with what looks like an invasion fleet.  When Rocket pulls the “I need your prosthetic” thing again, Peter jumps in the middle and shuts it down like he’s apologizing for his racist grandma. 
He comes off like a guy who’s had to invest way too much energy, for way too long, into figuring out how everyone can go home happy and nobody needs to die today.  Like, how many times has he seen some variation on the psychic arrow vs. Kree soldiers scene play out with Yondu because he couldn’t defuse a situation?
Peter Quill isn’t supposed to be a huge asshole. (That would be Rocket, for those of you playing along at home.)  He’s supposed to be a fuck-up who’s figuring out that there can be more to his life than chasing the next thrill, pathologically flouting authority, and dodging his abusive foster-family.

Now I agree that Peter is a peacemaker but for me the “I totally forgot you were here” did not come across to me like “I’m an asshole, women are disposable to me.” 
To me it was “Wow, was that just last night?” He is a guy who does more in few hours than most people do in a week. Say she slept a full 8 hours. He’s a very kinetic guy. In that time he slept 2-3 hours, did some routine maintenance on ship, got the info he was waiting for about the orb, plotted a course. Did a dance break, Had a little dinner. Gathered some supplies. He is guilty of a little out of sight, out of mind with his friend  (who I take to be a friend with benefits rather one night stand)  when he sets out for the location of the orb. Later she is wearing the shirt which is obviously as precious to him as his walkman that he has kept it in very good condition for 20 years with no fuss. No awkwardness detected later on the trip home they are comfortable together but Peter is still a busy guy.

yup, I agree more with the second reading —a genuine ‘crap, I forgot about you’ rather than ‘oh yeah, I didn’t care enough to remember you were there’.
I mean I get why you’d read this as him being an ass, but tbh I don’t think that’s what it was supposed to convey at all.

terresdebrume:

lewstonewar:

stuckinabucket:

I keep seeing a lot of justifications for the “Peter Quill forgot he had a passenger” thing that boil down to “No, it’s a totally cool way to illustrate that the character’s an asshole!  You know, for character development!” and it’s just like…not really, people.

I mean, yes, that is a way that you can demonstrate a character is a total asshole.  (There are also other ways to demonstrate that same thing that doesn’t come off as an “lol fuck you” directed squarely at half your audience, but that’s a different argument.)  But the problem with that is that otherwise he doesn’t come off as the sort of asshole who’d do that sort of assholish thing.  He’s immature and dysfunctional and venal, yes.  But the first time we get any sort of character scene for him, he’s got a black eye from getting into a righteous-anger fight over a dead frog.  He’s surrounded by what appears to be a loving family in the throes of grief, from whom he’s summarily kidnapped by what turns out to be a gang of space-pirates.

He spends the rest of the film coming off like the sort of person who’s had to play The Functional One for the crew of the HMS Warp Factor Clusterfuck for over half his life.  I don’t know if the repeated comments about eating him were meant to be taken absolutely at face value—there’s an argument to be made for reading them as some seriously fucked-up emotional blackmail rather than a genuine threat—but the dialogue about Yondu killing him if he gets out of line clearly isn’t a joke.  Whatever affection or use the pirates have for him, it’s explicitly not enough to keep him safe from them.  It’s not exactly an accident that the first instinct we see him showing almost every time there’s trouble is to try to smooth things over.

Rocket starts planning the escape from prison, and what happens? Groot straight-up rips something out of the fucking wall right in front of the guards.  Drax engages in some good old ultraviolence.  Gamora comes back with a device that was hardwired into somebody’s nervous system without batting an eye.  Peter…pays a guy a (judging by other sums mentioned) sizable chunk of money in exchange for the thing he needs.  Attempting to beat the dude up and take his stuff never even seems to occur to him.

He tries to talk everybody down when the other inmates are planning to murder Gamora.  He tries to talk everybody down when Rocket and Drax start fighting.  He’s the one who calls the Nova Corps to warn them instead of just showing up with what looks like an invasion fleet.  When Rocket pulls the “I need your prosthetic” thing again, Peter jumps in the middle and shuts it down like he’s apologizing for his racist grandma. 

He comes off like a guy who’s had to invest way too much energy, for way too long, into figuring out how everyone can go home happy and nobody needs to die today.  Like, how many times has he seen some variation on the psychic arrow vs. Kree soldiers scene play out with Yondu because he couldn’t defuse a situation?

Peter Quill isn’t supposed to be a huge asshole. (That would be Rocket, for those of you playing along at home.)  He’s supposed to be a fuck-up who’s figuring out that there can be more to his life than chasing the next thrill, pathologically flouting authority, and dodging his abusive foster-family.

Now I agree that Peter is a peacemaker but for me the “I totally forgot you were here” did not come across to me like “I’m an asshole, women are disposable to me.” 

To me it was “Wow, was that just last night?” He is a guy who does more in few hours than most people do in a week. Say she slept a full 8 hours. He’s a very kinetic guy. In that time he slept 2-3 hours, did some routine maintenance on ship, got the info he was waiting for about the orb, plotted a course. Did a dance break, Had a little dinner. Gathered some supplies. He is guilty of a little out of sight, out of mind with his friend  (who I take to be a friend with benefits rather one night stand)  when he sets out for the location of the orb. Later she is wearing the shirt which is obviously as precious to him as his walkman that he has kept it in very good condition for 20 years with no fuss. No awkwardness detected later on the trip home they are comfortable together but Peter is still a busy guy.

yup, I agree more with the second reading —a genuine ‘crap, I forgot about you’ rather than ‘oh yeah, I didn’t care enough to remember you were there’.

I mean I get why you’d read this as him being an ass, but tbh I don’t think that’s what it was supposed to convey at all.

aspergersissues:

rayvenloaf:

I’m going to be completely honest here and say i wish this man had been my father if he was going to just actually tell me the truth like this.

This is the best life lessons I’ve ever heard from a single human being. I wish my parents had taught me half of this.

(Source: opencult)

"The movie establishes that there are no white saviours there to make things better. Belle is forced to do that for herself, and it’s her journey in educating herself and trying to convince her chief justice uncle to vote against the legality of the slave trade that makes the film more fascinating than most films in this genre."Zeba Blay, TIFF 2013 Review on Belle.

(Source: notbrandyalexanders)

Identifying victims of violent crime as “prostitutes” has a distancing effect: it makes “normal” women feel safe. This good girl/bad girl binary interacts with the normal man/client binary to create “extraordinary” circumstances within which this violence can occur. Arguably, when “good” women are murdered by men, this creates a threat to all women and a woman’s place/space of work or how outside of normalised sexual activities she steps is no longer relevant […]

The term “prostitute” does not simply mean a person who sells her or his sexual labour (although rarely used to describe men in sex work), but brings with it layers of “knowledge” about her worth, drug status, childhood, integrity, personal hygiene and sexual health. When the media refers to a woman as a prostitute, or when such a story remains on the news cycle for only a day, it is not done in isolation, but in the context of this complex history.